Chip Editor Tool

Under the hood, the Pixel Vision 8 engine is broken down into several "chips" that control how the engine behaves. The Chip Editor allows you to make changes to each of these chips and define the system limitations for each game. After opening the data.json file, you’ll be presented with a graphical representation of the system’s chips.

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The specs panel underneath the chips represents a summary of a system template’s limitations.

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It is broken down into six aspects that map over to Pixel Vision 8’s built-in chips. Here are the main chips groups that make up a working system: resolution, colors, sprites, tilemap, sounds, and music. Together these limitations help define what you can and can’t do when making PV8 games and tools.

Here is a breakdown of each property:

Resolution

W

Width

The width of the screen’s resolution.

H

Height

The height of the screen’s resolution.

Colors

T

Total

The total number of colors the system supports.

PS

Colors Per Sprite

Total colors per sprite.

Sprites

T

Total Sprites

The total number of sprites allowed in memory.

Max

Maximum Sprites

The maximum number of sprites the display can render in a single frame.

Tilemap

W

Width

The width (in tiles) of the tilemap.

H

Height

The height (in tiles) of the tilemap.

Sound

CH

Channels

The total number of channels on which the system can play sounds.

T

Total

The total number of sound effects the system can store in its memory.

Music

TR

Tracks

The total number of tracks the music chip can use to playback sounds.

T

Total

The total amount of music data the system can store in its memory.

Finally, if you want to access some of the more advanced options, simply edit the data.json file directly. In the Chip Editor, you can access this option via the drop-down menu.

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Each chip has its own properties. Changes here will directly impact how a Pixel Vision 8 game runs so be careful when editing these settings by hand.

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